Skip to Content

Mind-I

THE SEARCH FOR MIND: FOUNDATIONS OF COGNITIVE SCIENCE
University of Sheffield, England
Date: 
Monday, 3 April, 1995 - Tuesday, 4 April, 1995
Deadlines: 

No deadlines entered for this conference.

The assumption underlying this workshop is that Cognitive Science (CS) is in crisis. The crisis manifests itself, as exemplified by the recent Buffalo summer institute, in a complete lack of consensus among even the biggest names in the field on whether CS has or indeed should have a clearly identifiable focus of study; the issue of identifying this focus is a separate and more difficult one. Though academic programs in CS have in general settled into a pattern compatible with classical computationalist CS (Pylyshyn 1984, Von Eckardt 1993), including the relegation from focal consideration of consciousness, affect and social factors, two fronts have been opened on this classical position.

The first front is well-publicised and highly visible. Both Searle (1992) and Edelman refuse to grant any special status to information-processing in explanation of mental process. In contrast, they argue, we should focus on Neuroscience on the one hand and Consciousness on the other. The other front is ultimately the more compelling one. It consists of those researchers from inside CS who are currently working on consciousness, affect and social factors and do not see any incompatibility between this research and their vision of CS, which is that of a Science of Mind (see O Nuallain (in press) and Mc Kevitt and Patridge 1991, Mc Kevitt and Guo 1994).

Mind-I PROCEEDINGS AS BOOK:
Ó Nualláin, Seán, Paul Mc Kevitt and Eoghan Mac Aogháin (Eds.) (1997), Two sciences of mind, Readings in Cognitive Science and Consciousness, Advances in Consciousness Research, AiCR, Vol. 9. Amsterdam, The Netherlands/Philadelphia, USA: John Benjamins Publishing Company.

http://www.benjamins.com/cgi-bin/t_bookview.cgi?bookid=AiCR%209